Physio uses prosecco as incentive for pelvic health evening

Thursday 30th August 2018
A charity event in Bath will be using prosecco to entice women to come along and learn about pre-emptive pelvic floor exercises that will help prevent post-childbirth problems.
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A physiotherapist has devised a cunning way to persuade lots of women to attend a charity event aimed at helping women prevent hip and pelvic floor problems that can arise from childbirth - free prosecco.

Specialist physio Emma Smith will be using the promise of some sparkling wine to ensure a good attendance at the Prosecco and Pelvic Floor charity event, which will take place at the Macdonald Bath Spa on September 18th.

The idea of the event is to advise women about how they can exercise to prevent major problems occurring after childbirth, training their bodies to cope with the effects of gestation.

Many of the problems that can arise may manifest themselves over the long term, lasting for many years after a child is born. For this reason, prevention is evidently better than cure.  

Speaking to the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy's website, she remarked: "I see people post-operatively who say, 'if only they had seen me earlier …' This is intended as prehab - to show women how to prevent problems that can result from childbirth, such as pelvic pain, incontinence and sexual dysfunction."

Ms Smith, a pelvic pain specialist at Royal United Hospitals, emphasised that the event will be a fun one, not "serious or negative", including raffles and quizzes to help raise money for a new therapies building at the hospital and the Therapies Matters Campaign.

She will also be using prosecco as a means of tempting women to attend a general wellness workshop on September 27th. 

Among the problems that can arise from pelvic floor issues is pelvic floor dysfunction. This leads to muscles contracting when they should be relaxing, which makes it difficult to complete bowel movements. It can also make urination painful and cause lower back pain.

The inability to control muscle contraction or relaxation properly can also impair sexual function, making the act painful. 

Written by Matthew Horton

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